Burglars don’t just break into your house, they invade your privacy

“Burglars won’t find anything too valuable in my home anyway”

A widespread opinion which isn’t addressing the issue in its entirety. The worst ramifications might not even be the stolen material goods, but the effects on the psychological well-being of the burglary victim. How would you react if you found out that potentially everything in your home has been touched by a masked person? Personal drawers have been rifled through, or worse, entire rooms destroyed.

Clearly such an experience leaves mental scars.

Our home is the base from which we explore the world. Having a safe place to come back to is vital.

Our home is the base from which we explore the world. Having a safe place to come back to is vital.


Home is our base. It is the place we return to after being exposed to the challenges of the world. Home is where we relax and feel protected from external stress factors. The significance of a safe home, where your privacy is a given, is not constantly apparent because it has never actually been intruded for the most part. You just expect your space to be strictly yours until an actual burglary happens to you or someone you know.


Rather than just into a housing facility, a burglar breaks into you psychological safe space. DeLisi* calls this an “affront to the security of victims”. Amongst other scientists, Matt DeLisi has studied this topic in his article The Aftermath of Criminal Victimization: Race, Self-Esteem, and Self-Efficacy. He stated that: “burglary entails a violation of the sanctity of the home in addition to collateral victimization usually in the form of stolen property” and “is a personal affront to the security of victims and carries with it multiple costs and psychological concerns”. He mentions an important premise why we at mitipi want to help you keep your home safe. Which is, while the reason for burglary is of monetary nature, the impact is a deep invasion into the sanctity of the home. Click here, if you want to read more on DeLisi’s findings.

And these problems can get serious. It is not uncommon for those psychological impacts to last longer than just during the immediate aftermath. If early symptoms have been detected, then the chances for PTSD are at an increased level as M.J.J Kunst found out in a study about victims of domestic burglary called Satisfaction With the Initial Police Response and Development of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Victims of Domestic Burglary. He also linked it to the satisfaction with the police intervention and different preconditions, that will likely determine the possible effects of domestic burglary on victims. Worth the read.


Insured property is nice, but only helps, once the burglary has already taken place…

We at mitipi will soon be able to offer you an all around insurance package for your home and a connected surveillance camera system, which is linked to your Kevin and your smartphone. This means you can intervene fast from wherever you are and possibly find out who the intruder was post-burglary, if not even already caught in the act. But what really helps your psychological well being, is if the burglary never actually goes down, as the bad guys intend it to. Prevention is the key. Turn on your Kevin, lock your door and windows when you leave. Also, if you want a guide on how to secure your home sign up for our newsletter.

Also If you want interesting information on this topic in German, then here is a helpful link.

* He is the coordinator of criminal justice studies, faculty affiliate with the Center for the Study of Violence, and associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Iowa State University

Sources:

  • DeLisi, M. et.al. (2014) The Aftermath of Criminal Victimization: Race, Self-Esteem, and Self-Efficacy, Journal Crime & Delinqunecy Vol. 60(1) 85 –105.

  • Satisfaction With the Initial Police Response and Development of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Victims of Domestic Burglary, Journal of Traumatic Stress Vol. 26(1), 111-118.

Victor Roth